Category Archives: Plant-based diets

Oatmeal, Satiety and the Satiety Index

A small study titled “Acute Effect of Oatmeal on Subjective Measures of Appetite and Satiety Compared to Ready-to-Eat Breakfast Cereal: A Randomized Crossover Study” was recently published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition.

The study showed that a simple low caloric, high satisfaction breakfast primarily of oatmeal “can prolong the period between meals and thus help establish habits conducive to weight loss.”

β-glucan content of the oatmeal, a viscous fiber, seems to result in the high satiety index of oatmeal. Its important to note that the oatmeal be as unprocessed as possible, for example muesli is only half as satisfying as oatmeal using the satiety index.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07315724.2013.816614#.UpJMjmTXRk4

 

The Satiety Index of foods was developed by Susanna Holt PhD, and associates at the University Of Sydney. It adds a further refinement to other food indexes such as the Glycemic Index

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glycemic_index.

Interestingly even though boiled potatoes are high on the Glycemic Index they are also the highest food on the Satiety Index. Meaning that if you fill up on them (note, not fries) you will stay full for a long time and therefore eat less. If you eat them with other foods, you will eat less.

More on this at http://www.mendosa.com/satiety.htm

 

The Pima Paradox also shows how a high Satiety Index can greatly alter a high Glycemic Index score.

Whereas the Pima Indians have a significant genetic propensity toward diabetes which manifests in those consuming (in Arizona) a modern diet of plentiful refined carbohydrates, animal fat and protein. Their traditional diet (still consumed in Mexico) however comprises large amounts of corn and potatoes as well as activity, resulting in lean body mass and rare incidence of hyperinsulinemia, obesity and type 2 diabetes (NIDDM).

http://foodandhealth.com/cpecourses/giobesity.php

 

Thomas Martin LAc.

Efficient Absorption Mechanism for Plant-source Iron Discovered

The following study outlining a new understanding of plant source iron absorption was reported in Science DailyE. C. Theil, H. Chen, C. Miranda, H. Janser, B. Elsenhans, M. T. Nunez, F. Pizarro, K. Schumann. Absorption of Iron from Ferritin Is Independent of Heme Iron and Ferrous Salts in Women and Rat Intestinal Segments. Journal of Nutrition, 2012; DOI:10.3945/jn.111.145854 – http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120120003510.htm

 

 “Our study shows that this different mechanism of iron absorption from plant ferritin is more efficient and gives the intestinal cells more control. It can be a new way to help solve global iron deficiency,” says Dr. Theil…

…ferritin iron is absorbed in its protein-coated, iron mineral form by a different, independent mechanism; iron absorbed as ferritin, leaves the intestine more slowly, but may, provide greater safety to the intestines than iron supplements…

In addition to potentially being safer, causing less irritation to the intestines, absorption of iron as ferritin is easier for the intestine. The iron found in meat and non-meat iron supplements enters the intestine from food one iron atom at a time. Each entry step requires the intestinal cells to use up energy. When the intestine takes in a single molecule of ferritin, however, it gets a thousand atoms inside that one ferritin molecule, making iron absorption that much more efficient.

…the results demonstrate that ferritin-rich foods such as legumes can provide a significant source of dietary iron for those in the greatest need of increasing their iron consumption.

Legumes and other plant foods were found to be a good source of highly absorbable ferritin iron which seems to overcome the absorption inefficiency seen in those with iron deficiency. This is significant as it provides an environmentally sustainable supply of dietary iron in plant-based diets low or absent of animal foods. It also suggests that balanced, economically viable plant sources of iron in developing countries are realistically obtainable through agricultural reorganization and dietary planning.

One final point, countering the popular notion that vegetarian diets or diets absent in red meat promote iron deficiency is that the available evidence shows no difference between the incidence of  iron deficiency anemia in vegetarians compared with meat eaters. In other words both groups show a similar incidence.

http://www.adajournal.org/medline/record/ivp_00029165_76_100

http://www.adajournal.org/medline/record/ivp_00029165_70_353

 

Thomas Martin LAc.